How To Make French Press Coffee? | Ultimate Buying Guide

Majority of people use the French press incorrectly. Insane, since it is one of the most common methods of brewing coffee in the world. It is really pretty easy to make perfect coffee with a French press when you know how to make French press coffee.

One of the simplest and least expensive ways to make decent coffee is with a French press. Learn the basics: how to make a decent cup of French press coffee.

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How To Make French Press Coffee?

The most troublesome part of making French press coffee is getting started. To ensure success, make sure you have the appropriate equipment on hand. But once you’ve mastered that, the rest is easy.

Why do you use a French press to brew your coffee? Most of the reasons for the popularity of the French press are that it is a surprisingly easy way to brew strong coffee at home. There are just a few things you’ll need and learning how to use a French press is easy. You’ll be addicted until you understand how to French press coffee:

Step 1: GATHER THE MATERIALS

You’ll need a grinder, a French press, a measuring cup, a scale, a timer, a thermometer, water, and a bowl of freshly roasted coffee beans for this French press coffee recipe.

Step 2: WORK OUT HOW MUCH COFFEE YOU’RE GOING TO BREW

When learning how to French press coffee, preparation and planning go a long way. The amount of coffee to water you use will be determined by how many cups you want to make, so figure out how many before you start grinding. Calculate how many ounces of water and how many grammes of beans you’ll need.

Step 3: GRIND THE COFFEE BEANS 

Depending on the type of grinder you have, you can already have a “coarse” setting that makes it simple and convenient. If you’re grinding the beans by hand, grind them until they’re coarse and uniform in texture. Extra coarse grinds are used more often in immersion brewing than medium coarse grinds, so grind slowly and look for larger grinds rather than smaller particles.

Step 4: POUR THE WATER WHERE IT HAS BEEN HEATED.

Feel free to heat your water when you’re making your grind size if you’ve mastered your grind. However, we always advise new brewers to spend as much time as they need grinding their beans so that they can dump the heated water into the press as soon as it’s finished. Using your thermometer, get the water to a temperature of about 195°F. If you don’t have a thermometer, heat the water for a minute before dumping into the French press.

Step 5: ALLOW IT TO BLOOM

Here’s a trick to make you look like a professional barista. As soon as you spill the first few ounces of water over the grounds, you’ll find that the mixture starts to bubble and a frothy foam-like layer forms on top. A ‘bloom,’ or the eruption of gases from the coffee beans, is referred to as this. Allow it to bloom for 30 to 45 seconds for a more flavorful result, then finish pouring the remaining water.

Step 6: ADD THE GROUNDS TO THE WATER AND STIR THEM IN 

After pouring the heated water onto the beans, thoroughly swirl the brew to ensure that all the coffee grounds are soaked.

Step 7: STEEP THE COFFEE GROUNDS

After that, set the timer and wait for the coffee grounds to steep. Most brewers recommend steeping these grounds for three to four minutes, while others recommend steeping them for six to eight minutes to get the best taste. Keep in mind that mastering extraction time can be challenging, so you can need to play with various steeping times. Start with three minutes and 30 seconds and change the time depending on the bitterness or boldness of the flavor.

Step 8: THE CRUST SHOULD BE CONSIDERED

When the coffee steeps, the bloom will form a crust-like coating on top of the coffee. You should either use a spoon to scrape it or stir it into the coffee. If you leave it in the coffee, it will produce a bolder, full-bodied taste, and if you take it out, it will produce a lighter flavor.

Step 9: POUR AND PLUNGE

You’re able to use the coffee press now that you’ve done brewing. Push the press all the way down to the beaker’s rim. Keep a calm hand on the plunger to avoid slamming it down. You’ll find that a coarse grind requires less effort, while a fine grind necessitates more effort. When you take the dive, it should feel normal. After you dive, immediately spill the coffee into your cup.

Step 10: ENJOY YOUR CUP AND SAVE THE REST FOR LATER.

You’ve just made your first cup of French press coffee, which is a huge accomplishment. Serve yourself, your family, or your visitors when admiring your work of art. When everybody has finished their cup, pour the remaining coffee into a thermos to keep it warm and hot.

Mistakes People Make When It Comes To Making French Press Coffee

Let’s face it: making a decent cup of coffee isn’t without its difficulties. And if you’re not a master barista, you can make a fantastic cup of coffee at home. Many homebrewers, on the other hand, discover that there is a learning curve that necessitates trial and error. While the French press approach seems to be easy, there are a few simple ways to mess up the final flavor. We’ve discovered that at-home coffee brewers often make the following three errors:

  • The coffee grind map is one of the most valuable things to know or have on hand whether you’re interested in making your own French press coffee at home — or some other coffee. The seven different grind sizes, which range from extra coarse to mild to fine, are appropriate for different coffee varieties. A coarse grind with a consistency comparable to kosher salt is ideal for French press coffee.
  • Another common blunder is using the incorrect coffee-to-water ratio because some home brewers don’t bother to measure out any ingredient. They’ll simply grind as many beans as they think are necessary and fill the French press with water. You’ll need a 1:17 ratio for a regular cup and a 1:11 ratio for a smoother brew in a French Press.
  • Even if you have the right French press coffee grind size and water-to-grounds ratio, merely keeping the coffee in the French press after it’s finished brewing may have a detrimental effect on the flavor. If it remains in the French press, it will continue to brew, resulting in over-extraction and a sour taste. If you make more coffee than you need right now, keep it warm by storing it in an insulated cup, such as a thermos.

Water-to-Coffee Ratio for French Press

The directions below render 32 ounces, which is a standard size of a French press that serves four people. But what if you want to make a different amount? Here’s a general guide to volume proportions. It’s worth noting that coffee beans are weighed before being ground.

8 oz of water | 0.5 oz or 13.9 g of coffee per serving of daily coffee

8 oz of water | 0.7 oz or 21.5 g of coffee per serving of solid coffee

Two daily coffee servings: 16 oz water | 0.9 oz or 27.8 g coffee

16 oz of water | 1.5 oz or 42.9 g of coffee = two servings of solid coffee

4 daily coffee servings: 32 oz water | 1.9 oz or 55.5 g coffee

4 servings of solid coffee: 32 ounces of water | 2.9 ounces (85.8 grammes) of coffee

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Conclusion

One of the most basic coffee brewing techniques is the French press. It’s also great for extracting oils from coffee beans and catching their flavors and aromas. Whether you’re a seasoned French press user or considering making the transition from a drip coffee maker, I hope this article has helped you get the best out of this brewing process.

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